About

FuturePolicy.org is an online database designed for forward-thinking policy-makers, to simplify the sharing of existing and proven policy solutions to tackle the world’s most fundamental and urgent problems.

Grown from the conviction that solutions exist for the most essential challenges to humanity’s survival, FuturePolicy.org highlights the most exemplary policy solutions uncovered by the World Future Council’s specialised research.

The World Future Council first introduced FuturePolicy.org as Policy Action on Climate Toolkit (PACT) in 2007, which focused on Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs (FITs). In 2009, an energy efficiency section was added, then other Commissions of the World Future Council also began to contribute.

The new version of our policy website goes beyond the climate change challenge alone. Recognising the importance of interconnections to sustainable policy solutions, we aim to highlight all research carried out by the World Future Council structured according to the broad thematic chapters of the Global Policy Action Plan.


gpact_finalThe Global Policy Action Plan (GPACT) provides the policy parameters needed to address current world emergencies.

The breakthrough policies described within the action plan represent a combination of tried and tested policies that have been successful in one or more countries, and optimal policy solutions we have identified through extensive research. GPACT is currently available in English, French and Spanish.


fpa_finalThe Future Policy Award celebrates policies that create better living conditions for current and future generations. The aim of the award is to raise global awareness for these exemplary policies and speed up policy action towards just, sustainable and peaceful societies. The Future Policy Award is the first award that celebrates policies rather than people on an international level. Each year the World Future Council chooses one topic on which policy progress is particularly urgent.


futurejustlaw_finalPolicies are determined to be “best”, if they align with the future-just law-making principles as adopted by the International Law Association following 10 years of academic formulation. These were then agreed upon in 2002 by 192 states participating in the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg.

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